Intrauterine Device

Intrauterine Device

The modern intrauterine device (IUD) is a piece of plastic shaped like a T (Mirena) that contains a hormone called progestogen.

A doctor inserts the IUD through the vagina and cervix to sit inside the uterus (womb). The IUD acts by irritating the internal lining of the uterus (endometrium) and by preventing ovulation and preparation of the endometrium to receive and host the fertilized egg “ovum”, thus preventing the egg from implanting so no pregnancy can develop. The IUD can also be used as an after sex contraceptive device if inserted within five days of unprotected intercourse.

(Last modified: 9th Oct 2014)

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